RNA Symposium 2017

MiSciWriters is proud to partner with the University of Michigan Center for RNA Biomedicine to provide a live coverage of the 2nd annual symposium: “RNA in Precision Medicine.” We will live-blog the events here, and live-tweet from @MiSciWriters  9:10 am to 3:15 pm. on March 31st. Live-blogging coverage is released as an event unfolds, placing the … Continue reading RNA Symposium 2017

Computing Levinthal’s Paradox: Protein Folding, Part 2

Author: Sarah Kearns Editors: David Mertz, Zuleirys Santana Rodriguez, and Scott Barolo In a previous post, we discussed how proteins fold into unique shapes that allow them to perform their biological functions. Through many physical and chemical properties, like hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity, proteins are able to fold correctly. However, proteins can fold improperly, and … Continue reading Computing Levinthal’s Paradox: Protein Folding, Part 2

Homework: a Necessity or an Age-Old Brain Drain?

Author: Amira Aker Editors: Shweta Ramdas, Zena Lapp, and David Mertz Everyone hates homework. It’s boring, annoying, and takes you away from a million other things you’d rather be doing. But I always thought it was a necessary part of learning. How else could you learn without effort and a little struggle? As a Ph.D. … Continue reading Homework: a Necessity or an Age-Old Brain Drain?

Training T Cell Assassins

Author: John Charpentier Editors: Zena Lapp, Theresa Mau, and David Mertz     The assassins have a description of their targets, who are hiding in plain sight among the non-combatants. The targets are guerillas who’ve infiltrated the neighborhood, overwhelming the local authorities and fomenting chaos. After only minutes on patrol, the assassins go on the … Continue reading Training T Cell Assassins

How to Fold (and Misfold) a Protein (Part 1)

Author: Sarah Kearns Editors: David Mertz, Zulierys Santana-Rodriguez, and Scott Barolo Proteins do most of the work in your body: Depending on their shape, they can digest your food, fire your neurons, give color to your eyes and allow you to see colors. Proteins follow instructions encoded in your DNA to fold into their shape, … Continue reading How to Fold (and Misfold) a Protein (Part 1)

Michigan Researchers Seek New Chemistries to Diversify Rechargeable Battery Applications

Author: Jimmy Brancho Editors: Irene Park and David Mertz Off the Danish coast in Copenhagen, Don Siegel, an associate professor in the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering, is on sabbatical. He said the ocean is speckled with tall, white windmills. At some sites, they stand in great curving rows; at others, they’re arrayed in … Continue reading Michigan Researchers Seek New Chemistries to Diversify Rechargeable Battery Applications

Science behind the scenes: The costs and payoffs of science

By: Bryan Moyers Edited by:  David Mertz, Shweta Ramdas, Scott Barolo, Kevin Boehnke Why haven’t we cured cancer?  Physicians have known about cancer for over 5000 years, and the United States spends nearly $5 billion per year on cancer research.  But there’s still no cure.  Also, where is our clean, renewable energy?  We can’t even … Continue reading Science behind the scenes: The costs and payoffs of science

Team

  Director and Social Media Coordinator: Sarah Kearns Working towards getting her Ph.D. in Chemical Biology at the University of Michigan, Sarah studies the molecular roads of the cell in the Cianfrocco and Verhey labs. Outside of research, she is active in science communication by writing for her blog Annotated Science, freelancing with the American Institute of Physics, editing … Continue reading Team