Homework: a Necessity or an Age-Old Brain Drain?

Author: Amira Aker Editors: Shweta Ramdas, Zena Lapp, and David Mertz Everyone hates homework. It’s boring, annoying, and takes you away from a million other things you’d rather be doing. But I always thought it was a necessary part of learning. How else could you learn without effort and a little struggle? As a Ph.D. … Continue reading Homework: a Necessity or an Age-Old Brain Drain?

The Science of What Keeps Us Apart

Author: Kaitlin Weskamp Editors: Shweta Ramdas, Alex Taylor, and Kevin Boehnke “… in diversity there is beauty and there is strength.”               ― Maya Angelou Over time, there has been a general trend towards acceptance and inclusivity in the civil rights laws of the United States. From the abolition of slavery in 1865, to granting women … Continue reading The Science of What Keeps Us Apart

How Your Electronic Health Records Could Help Biomedical Research

Author: Brooke Wolford Editors: Jimmy Brancho, Shweta Ramdas, Bryan Moyers Think back to the last time you visited your primary care physician. Was the health care provider using a laptop or tablet to take notes and update your health information? In many doctors’ offices across the country your health records have gone digital. In addition … Continue reading How Your Electronic Health Records Could Help Biomedical Research

It’s all in the family! But how? The biology of inheritance Part 2

Author: Shweta Ramdas Editors: Molly Kozminsky, Christina Vallianatos, Bryan Moyers If you haven’t been living under a rock for the last five years, you have definitely come across headlines to the tune of “Researchers Find Gene for X”, where X can be anything from happiness, to political affiliation, to your preference for cilantro. There are … Continue reading It’s all in the family! But how? The biology of inheritance Part 2

What the octopus genome can tell us

Author: Shweta Ramdas Editors: Irene Park, Ada Hagan, Alisha John The team at MiSciWriters certainly finds cephalopods fascinating, and we aren’t alone. Last year, the octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) was added to the growing list of organisms whose genome sequence is known. Octopuses belong to a class of organisms called cephalopods, which literally means ‘head-feet’ (members … Continue reading What the octopus genome can tell us

Science behind the scenes: The costs and payoffs of science

By: Bryan Moyers Edited by:  David Mertz, Shweta Ramdas, Scott Barolo, Kevin Boehnke Why haven’t we cured cancer?  Physicians have known about cancer for over 5000 years, and the United States spends nearly $5 billion per year on cancer research.  But there’s still no cure.  Also, where is our clean, renewable energy?  We can’t even … Continue reading Science behind the scenes: The costs and payoffs of science

It’s all in the family! The biology of inheritance, part 1

Author: Shweta Ramdas Editors: Molly Kozminsky, Jimmy Brancho, Kevin Boehnke   Harry Potter has his mother’s eyes. From his father, James, he inherits his black hair, his ability to play Quidditch, and a certain predisposition to mischief. We are all unique combinations of our parents, receiving half our DNA from each. In the genetic lottery, … Continue reading It’s all in the family! The biology of inheritance, part 1

Mother’s protein intake can affect her child’s weight

Author: Shweta Ramdas Editors: Ada Hagan, Alisha John, Bryan Moyers, and Irene Park Google “diet for pregnant or nursing mothers”, and you’ll be swamped with web pages recommending foods that help the baby and foods to avoid. There has been considerable research indicating that the diet of pregnant mothers can affect the child’s health (including … Continue reading Mother’s protein intake can affect her child’s weight